Where did I start making sculpture?





Motional Figure by mark Stammers © 2010 – arch part polished


Here the arch’s edges have been ground to a smooth radius and initial polishing.


 




Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – front leg polished

 The front leg after polishing.






Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – front leg weld correction



Some specialist weld correction


 





Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – weld

Fine detail of weld







Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – front leg & arch

 Front leg & arch ready to be connected.







Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – arch & front leg connected & polished










Front leg & arch connected.






Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – rear leg welded


 Rear after assembly and Julian has completed assembly & welding along corners.





Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – inside rear leg
 



 


 


 


 


 


 Top end of the rear leg.





Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – grinding edges of R leg









 

       


 




 

       


 



 








Grinding corners again.



Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – grinding corners





 


 


 


 


 


 


 





Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – polishing R leg


 


 


 


 


 


Polishing surface






Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – Poilishing R leg


 









 


 


 


 


Polishing Development.






Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – polished R leg



 


 


 


 


 


 


Completing Polishing to the rear leg.






Motional Figure by Mark Stammers © 2010 – surface finnish



 


 


 


 


 








Surface Finnish to the stainless steel.







Going back a long way, before making abstract art.



One of my early metalwork projects. The engineering teacher Mr. Kingston was certain that making this steam traction engine model would cover all of the metalworking techniques for GCSE O level.


     


Fairly advanced for the time in recycling, you can just see the Red Cedar paint tin label     showing inside the roof.






Material Immaterial by Mark Stammers©2011

This is not without significance because I became interested in material processes and the environment, collecting some pieces of discarded processed debris from the roadside, I made some painting or collage pieces from these and found they contained the Immaterial Material sense of things that I was looking for. 


I made a series of these that counterbalanced my works on paper (1990’s) where I was painting a definite clearly defined line that at the same time had the effect of leaving a sense of uncertainty and the indefinite.


This led to finding pieces from the environment; here a branch has an uncanny likeness to a satyr.





Satyr by Mark Stammers©2011

My interest in making art in solid materials began in this way, pairing 3-D objects with paintings: like the East-West piece paired with the tempera painting East-West.  





East West Part 2 by Mark Stammers©2011

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This was more or less one of the few figure pieces or figure paintings I made in the 90’s – mostly making small abstract paintings then.


Every so often making drawings for large public art pieces – probably a way of finding more space to create.


These are some of the origins to my sculpture & public art pieces and how they relate to painting.





Motional Figure parts at the engineering works by Mark Stammers©2011

Getting up to date I am now in the process of completing my most recent public art piece the ‘Motional Figure’ – some of the parts are shown here:


This is a pic from Jan/Feb 2010, when collecting the pieces from the engineering works,  now assembled, polished and the whole piece nearly completed ready to install for later in the summer. 


 


The pieces were cut out from my drawings and templates that took some time to make and test, making 1/7th, 1/3rd, and a full size models to make sure the curves were close enough to make the welds & edges fit, while keeping the original sense of the piece from the drawings.






Welding the arch to the Motional Figure by Mark Stammers ©2010

Some views here of the welding of the arch:





Welding the edges of the arch to the Motional Figure by Mark Stammers ©2010 – Julian Tig welding. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Mark grinding the welds & shaping the corner radii  to the front leg ©Mark Stammers 2010

 


And of the front leg:


 


                                                                                                     







Front leg construction welds to the Motional Figure by Mark Stammers© 2011

 – let my finger off the trigger just as the shutter closed on the camera, so no sparks.






Polished front leg to the Motinal Figure by Mark Stammers©2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Mark Stammers

Is a Visual & Fine Artist making abstract Sculpture & Painting, public art and commissions.
This entry was posted in stainless steel sculpture_Motional Figure and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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